by / April 4th, 2016 /

Buzzcocks to play 40th anniversary Irish shows

One of the most important and influential bands in popular music, Buzzcocks have announced a World Tour to celebrate their 40th Anniversary in 2016, including a welcome stop off at Belfast’s Limelight on November 4th and Dublin’s Academy on November 5th. Despite forming during the short-lived Punk-era, Pete Shelley and co. have exercised unparalleled longevity, and sustained creative energy to produce a seemingly endless stream of truly original, fantastic pop songs over a remarkable four decade career.

With the band only taking in one night in Belfast and one in Dublin, tickets for the gig are sure to be in high demand. Make sure you get yours this Thursday, April 7th, available through Ticketmaster for the measly price of £20 / €25.

 

  • plumberpete

    “Despite forming during the short-lived Punk era”

    News flash to all journalists – Punk didn’t start and end with the Sex Pistols.

  • Shane TrashSeagull

    It pretty much did.

  • plumberpete

    I’d do a bit of research before laying your ignorance like a bare baboon’s arse for all to see if I were you.

  • Shane TrashSeagull

    Oh I was there, lived through it, & the fag end of the “punk’s not dead” crowd, oi, etc were just taking the lowest common denominator of what punk was & killed it.

  • plumberpete

    So was I, and seeing as though Oi and “punk’s not dead” was an eighties thing that’s at least 2 more years than most journalists give credit for.
    By 1978 Punk was just about warming up. Some cracking bands released material from 1978 onwards including SLF, U.K. Subs, Menace, Angelic Upstarts, Rezillos, and Siouxsie and the Banshees. Plus I would argue that some of the original Punk bands such as The Damned, The Clash and The Buzzcocks released their best material after this point.
    If we look to the 80’s the output by Punk bands was at its most prolific, but because since the late 70’s most Punk music was released through independent labels, and I think this is the crux of most journalistic thinking at that time, major labels is where the freebies were so Punk was deemed out of vogue, even though it was still incredibly popular..

  • Shane TrashSeagull

    I would say that punk as in the fashion, attitude, independence was indeed dead by the time of the albums you mention. Siouxsie & the Banshees released one of my favourite ever albums in 79 but most of the songs had been about for a while. The fact that they signed to Polydor was an indication that the music was accepted as no threat to the established way of doing things, even if they had artistic control. By this time, like all the bands you mention, it was being called New Wave, not only to make it more acceptable to the radio execs etc, but also to reassure a public that there was no great revolution in the offing. Wasn’t the Banshees split exactly about this – 2 members thought they should give the records away at a signing, 2 stuck with the accepted way that product should be paid for. No revolution there. Switch, the most recently written track had more to do with the best tendencies of prog than a year zero approach. We could go through each band, but my point is punk was a major change which quickly had its best musical forms accepted & can really no longer be called punk. It was a brief social movement which gave us some great new bands & changed some things, but as a revolution it achieved what it could then metamorphosed.