by / July 31st, 2012 /

Top Story: The Sex Pistols to release 35th-year anniversary edition of Never Mind The The Bollocks…

Universal Music and The Sex Pistols, the band that launched a thousand Manc bands, are set to release a 35th-year anniversary edition of the band’s only studio album Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s The Sex Pistols on September 24th. Featuring the L.P. itself (remastered by Tim Young and original producer Chris Thomas) along with a full collection of the album’s B-sides and studio rarities from the Never Mind… sessions, the bundle comes with a collection of 1977 live and previously unreleased recordings. And if that’s not enough, it features a live DVD produced by Julien Temple plus a 100-page hardback diary of photos, quotes and other such miscellany, and a replica of the band’s withdrawn 7″ edition of “God Save The Queen” from the period.

There is no denying the cultural impact of The Sex Pistols, and even if there is very little by means of ‘new’ material here, this release still comes as a timely reminder of one of the most controversial bands of their time. After years of reunions and break-ups the band have harvested a hit-and-miss live reputation along with enduring varying degrees of personal misadventure and not-so-filthy lucre (Sid & Nancy, I’m A Celebrity…, Country Life), but we should not forget that this is a band that rode roughshod over popular culture and its institutionally reinforced foundations. The Pistols perhaps altered the trajectory of British music in ways that only David Bowie and the Beatles ever did before them and fewer have done since. Even if some amongst us subscribe to the tired old wheeze regarding the bands ignominious formation and creative control, one of the most remarkable things about the band was that they brought the DIY ethos of many working-class bands to a sub-tyro level and inspired a generation of wasters, talentless try-hards and punks to ignore the notoriously hegemonic music industry try for themselves. Frankly put, no Pistols no Smiths, no Magazine, no Joy Division, no The Fall and no Factory Records; all of them allegedly bearing witness to the same gig.

What the Pistols did in an incredible short span of time was to create belief that anyone could be in a band ability to play was nearly optional. You didn’t have to be trained and you certainly didn’t have to conform to any set of rules or standards laid out by music’s powers that be. That will remain punk’s enduring legacy and despite any new audio curio or anything most Sex Pistols fans won’t already have, this may yet be the final chapter in one of music’s most notable tomes.

  • And, ahem, the young chappie on the lead vocals was from north London but Irish (John Lydon is an Irish citizen with an Irish passport, father from Galway, mother from Cork)